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The post-Bloomsbury sound of Princeton

Posted by Jason Diamond A few years back, the group Princeton released a four song ode to Virginia Woolf, Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes.  The EP was titled “Bloomsbury,” and without trying to sound like an overzealous hype man, it was one of the most perfect slices of lit pop that I’ve ever heard. Since then, the band have gone on to release a full length, and are back again with their newest single, “Clamoring For Your Heart.”

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New Stuff by Princeton

Fol Chen remix the song “Shout it Out”, and turn it into a banger, meanwhile, Princeton debut this new video for “Calypso Gold” Listen: Princeton, “Shout it Out” remixed by Fol Chen.

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Bites: Blake on display, Philly libraries, Justin Taylor on Zak Smith, Princeton in the Times, Drew hearts Jens, and more

Lit. The Morgan Library and Museum is showcasing the watercolors, prints, and illuminations of William Blake for the first time in two decades.  The show, entitled “William Blake’s World: A New Heaven Has Begun” is on display through January 3rd. The entire Philadelphia Free Library System is scheduled to close on October 2. The Brooklyn Book Festival is today.  If you’re willing to confront the brewing cloudiness outside, PEN’s event looks good, and so does Housing Works’. Hooves on The […]

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Bites: New Princeton song, bad children books, fiction issues, the growing influence of Kindle, and more

Last year when we conversed with Princeton (pictured above), they were just getting over the heaps of critical praise after six months promoting their phenomenal four song Bloomsbury EP, we hardly had any ideas about their future. Now, nearly five months after that conversation, the group gets set to release their first album on Kanine Records, Cocoon of Love, and have given us the first single, “Calypso Gold“. I now predict that the world is six months away from being […]

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Conversation: Princeton

Jessica Milton was kind enough to talk to our favorite band from Eagle Rock, Ca. Topics covered include (but not limited to) chamber-pop, basketball, and Keynesian economics. By Jessica Milton My first introduction to Princeton came this past fall at the monthly Vol. 1 event at Bar Matchless. I was stationed at the door when a very polite young man asked where the band, made up of twin brothers, Matt and Jesse Kivel, and Ben Usen, could put their instruments […]

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“Music Felt For Us, Was Ecstatic For Us”: An Interview With Lars Iyer

Lars Iyer

Like a lot of my favorite books, I bought Spurious by Lars Iyer partially due to the cover design – two plastic bags hovering provocatively on the edge of a parking lot (Melville House can really do a good book cover). But, like with all of my favorite books, what was inside the book changed my life. This book (and the rest of the Spurious Trilogy – Exodus and Dogma) oozed a sticky, refreshing style that completely shook me. I quickly became obsessed – with the culmination of the staccato chapters, with the overbearing third-person presence of the shit-talking W., with the unending push behind every idea that propels every image to its bleak, (il)logical extensions. I also loved this book for the unique central characters and their obsessions – two academics in philosophy who acknowledge that “the corpse of the university floats face down in the water”, who are also then “poking it with sticks,” and, of course, who talk unendingly about Kafka and Joy Division.

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Personal Essay

Personal Essay
by Grace Elliott

 

I am trying to learn how to write personal essays. For years, I have struggled with how to write true stories about myself. I worry about the lack of special in my life, the lack of event. 

“The point is not the events,” I tell myself now as I try to learn how to write essays. “The point is the frame.”

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“The Structure of the Book is a Bad Trip”: Joshua Wheeler On Writing “Acid West”

I got a chance to have a conversation with Joshua Wheeler, my teacher and friend, upon the release of his debut book of essays, Acid West, just out on FSG Originals. Joshua writes with a rhythm and comic timing reminiscent at times of John McPhee—a younger, more irreverent McPhee—who has definitely never set foot on the campus of Princeton like our aged master. Wheeler’s world is John Wayne and dive bars and adobe motels and thrift stores and desert dirt […]

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