Vol.1 Brooklyn’s August 2020 Book Preview

Vol.1 August 2020 books

Apparently it’s August now. Apparently summer has turned the corner and is beginning its slow approach into autumn. Nominally these things are happening, but the passage of time has gotten a bit strange lately. Still, there are plenty of books, and that’s an excellent thing. Do you like powerful, resonant nonfiction? August has that covered. What about surreal, high-concept fiction? Also around. Here are a few of the books we’re most excited about that are due out this month.

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Reinventing Postmodernism: A Review of Charles Yu’s “Interior Chinatown”

Charles Yu book cover

Once upon a time, when postmodernism was young—before it became what-the-hell-is-postmodernism-really(?) and post-postmodernism—unique literary conceits were enough to draw oohs and ahs from critics. Think of John Barth with the nested narrative loops and literary equations of Lost in the Funhouse; Nabokov with the fiction inside poetry inside criticism of Pale Fire; or Coover with his cinematic A Night at the Movies. Great as those works were in their time, the audacious formal tricks that defined them have, to a great extent, already been tried. The novel as screenplay…or treatment…or cinema, for example, has been done and done and done. So much that when I came to Charles Yu’s latest, Interior Chinatown, I wondered whether there could possibly be enough of a point to what seems primarily a formal experiment. Could Yu, a writer I confess to liking, even admiring, possibly do enough to justify publishing a novel like this in 2020? Then I read it. And, in this instance, at least, reading is believing.

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Six Ridiculous Questions: Eugen Bacon

Eugen Bacon

The guiding principle of Six Ridiculous Questions is that life is filled with ridiculousness. And questions. That only by giving in to these truths may we hope to slip the surly bonds of reality and attain the higher consciousness we all crave. (Eh, not really, but it sounded good there for a minute.) It’s just. Who knows? The ridiculousness and question bits, I guess. Why six? Assonance, baby, assonance.

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Six Ridiculous Questions: Hosho McCreesh

Hosho McCreesh

The guiding principle of Six Ridiculous Questions is that life is filled with ridiculousness. And questions. That only by giving in to these truths may we hope to slip the surly bonds of reality and attain the higher consciousness we all crave. (Eh, not really, but it sounded good there for a minute.) It’s just. Who knows? The ridiculousness and question bits, I guess. Why six? Assonance, baby, assonance.

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