Dennie Wendt on Soccer, the 1970s, and Writing “Hooper’s Revolution”

American soccer in the 1970s was a strange time for the sport. Maybe you’ve seen the documentary Once in a Lifetime, or read David Wangerin’s comprehensive Soccer in a Football World. There was a brief moment when some of soccer’s biggest stars converged on the nascent NASL, and expansion teams popped up around the country. Dennie Wendt’s new novel Hooper’s Revolution is set in a fictionalized version of that scene: protagonist Danny Hooper arrived in the United States to play […]

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On Shop Novels, Past and Present

Consider the campus novel. It’s a genre within literary fiction capable of encompassing works as thematically and stylistically diverse as Donna Tartt’s The Secret History, Ishmael Reed’s Japanese by Spring, and Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim. As disparate as these novels are, however, one can find certain structures in common. Though no two colleges or universities are the same, the basic structures of most are similar enough that a hierarchy of characters can be easily established. (The same could be said […]

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Afternoon Bites: Parnassus Books Year One, Adapting “Wild” and “Under the Dome,” Inside “Discordia,” and More

Writer Laurie Penny and illustrator Molly Crabapple talked with Bitch about their collaboration Discordia, Christopher Hitchens, Djuna Barnes, and more. Ann Patchett on the first year in the life of her bookstore Parnassus Books. Jay Bulger on making a documentary about legendary drummer Ginger Baker. Molly Ringwald is interviewed by the Los Angeles Review of Books. Nick Hornby is adapting Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for the big screen. And Brian K. Vaughan is adapting Stephen King’s Under the Dome for television. Edward Champion looks into the […]

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Afternoon Bites: Coates on Chabon, Liturgy on Shellac, Hope Larson on “A Wrinkle In Time,” and More

Hope Larson adapted Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle In Time as a graphic novel. Ta-Nehisi Coates on Michael Chabon’s prose. Jason Santa Maria has some things to say about typefaces. Victor LaValle was interviewed at NPR. Perhaps the only time you’ll see “Liturgy” and “a capella Shellac cover” in the same sentence. Gabrielle Gantz on Nick Hornby’s More Baths Less Talking. Indie booksellers in NYC recommend their preferred fall books. Madeleine Miller’s essay “Writing at Six Miles an Hour” is quite good. […]

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Weekend Bites: Loving Paul Murray, Dueling Covers, Bad Jobs in Literature, and More

At Largehearted Boy: Paul Murray (Skippy Dies) picks Nation of Ulysses and Nick Cave for his Book Notes entry.  Largehearted Boy calls the book “one of the funniest novels of the year.” At Vice: James Ellory interviewed. At NPR: Nick Hornby on Fresh Air. At Thought Catalog: Putting a ton of thought into the Tao Lin/Jonathan Franzen Stranger/Time cover At Dangerous Minds: A letter from the Philip K. Dick auction. At Huffington Post: 9 bad jobs in literature. At The […]

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Bites: Stephen Elliott in Williamsburg, McSweeney’s Broadsheet, the Original Gossip Girl, Lethem Recommends Poe, Balloon boy FAQ, and more

Stephen Elliott hung out  in Williamsburg (went hard, if you will) and wrote about it on The Rumpus. Lit. Largehearted Boy reviews Nick Hornby’s Juliet, Naked. McSweeney’s to publish an old-fashioned, Sunday edition-sized broadsheet: San Francisco Panorama Jonathan Lethem  recommends on Daily Beast Edgar Allen Poe’s only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, and describes it as “the missing link between Mary Shelley and Herman Melville.” My kind of narrative. On Willa Cather’s development as a novelist. […]

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Bites: Fiction v. Non-Fiction, Poe’s Funeral, Proust’s Questions, Lev Grossman on being a critic, Wild Things, Hornby’s Education, Nick Cave & PJ Harvey, and more

Jim Shepard for Electric Literature on the subject of fiction based on non-fiction: “We need to bear in mind, as we’ve been told many times, that we’re working from, but not necessarily about, our lives.” Lit. Edgar Allen Poe gets a real funeral. (Thanks, The Rumpus) On Vanity Fair’s website, take Proust’s Questionnaire and find out which celebrities you most resemble. Lev Grossman guest-posts for and on the National Book Critics Circle blog. Film, a Quick Weekend Roundup What will […]

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Bites: Beast Books, Nick Hornby, Zeitoun haikus, Palin’s ghostwriter, and more

Daily Beast innovator Tina Brown is, in a joint venture with Perseus Books Group, starting a new imprint called Beast Books. The imprint will forgo the typical publishing schedule, which is, as Brown sees it, an untimely process that misses important opportunities to attract readers. At Book Beast, the entire process of writing and publishing (beginning with an e-book) will take a mere two to four months. Lit Nick Hornby interviewed at Flavorwire Write a haiku and you could get […]

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