Some Subversive Soviet-Era Science Fiction, Perhaps?

Those of you seeking unconventional speculative fiction would do well to delve into the works of Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. They wrote in the Soviet Union from the late 1950s through the late 1980s. Their novel Roadside Picnic was the inspiration for Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker, and Melville House recently released a new edition of their mindbending short novel Definitely Maybe, which blends metaphysical speculation and satire born of the paranoia of living in an authoritarian state.

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Welcome, Literary Guggenheim Fellows

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has announced their 2014 Fellows, and the list abounds with familiar names. The list includes Claire Vaye Watkins, Hari Kunzru, Meghan O’Rourke, and D.T. Max, and many more; you can read the whole thing below.

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Afternoon Bites: Rachel Kushner Interviewed, Richard Hell’s Memoir, Dueling Black Flags, Soderbergh and John Barth, and More

“My whole trajectory as a novelist is maybe about finding the form and through line of a constructed world that can hold in it what I really think about . . . everything.” Hari Kunzru interviewed Rachel Kushner for BOMB. At The Talkhouse, Amy Rebecca Klein wrote about Spring Breakers. Zach Baron reviewed Richard Hell’s memoir for Bookforum. Jerry Saltz ponders the fate of gallery shows. Stephen Soderbergh might be adapting John Barth’s The Sot-Weed Factor. Douglas Wolk on Don Giovanni Records. The Los Angeles Times […]

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