When Familial and Cinematic Histories Meet: A Review of Simon Roy’s “Kubrick Red”

Few books walk the space inhabited by Simon Roy’s Kubrick Red. At once obsessive, dark, philosophical, academic, and touching, Kubrick Red is a bizarre memoir that manages to deconstruct and celebrate Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining while laying out the hardest moments of Roy’s life as well as the continuing impact the film has had in his life. The result is a book that jumps from childhood memories to scene analyses to hybrid/experimental literary territory to coping with the loss of […]

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Stanley Kubrick: Chess Hustler

Check  out Jeremy Bernstein’s piece at the New York Review of Books blog:  “Playing Chess With Kubrick”. Kubrick explained that early in his career he too played chess for money in the park and that Duval was so weak that it was hardly worth playing him. I said that we should play some time and then left the apartment. I was quite sure that we would never play. I was wrong.

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Bites: Decent thoughts on today’s fiction (I know!), Bruni is replaced, Gladwell’s Mockingbird, Kubrick’s unmade work, middle-class “slave labor”

By Willa A. Cmiel Lee Seigel for the Washington Post on the End of the Episode.  It’s a greatly informed, well-put essay on changes in American fiction.  (Finally a good essay on contemporary fiction.  Seigel is critical but not raging, constructive but unassuming):  “Are you a Narrative or Episodic personality?… Or do you think that you live, like Huck Finn and every other picaresque hero, from isolated minute to isolated minute – episode to episode – and that far from adding […]

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