Afternoon Bites: Pinball Revival, Yo La Tengo Returns, The Holocene, and More

  Talking Yo La Tengo and the New York Mets with Ira Kaplan. Jayson Greene chatted with Parquet Courts, whose album Light Up Gold is terrifically catchy stuff. Dustin Kurtz interviewed the man behind the new DIY-themed magazine The Holocene. Josh Levin on the pinball revival. The trailer for Hemlock Grove, based on Brian McGreevy’s novel, is up now. Eric Nelson talked about his forthcoming book The Walt Whitman House. (We published Nelson’s “A Drink Among Friends” in 2011.) New music from Hilly Eye […]

Continue Reading

Baseball, Indie Rock and Yo La Tengo with Jesse Jarnow

Big Day Coming is the new book by music journalist/WFMU DJ Jesse Jarnow that tells the story of indie rock as it evolves through the lifespan of Yo La Tengo. Jarnow paints a picture not only of a band’s lifespan or of a genre’s inception, but of multiple decades of rock n roll history, music journalism, and the city of Hoboken, New Jersey. Yo La Tengo, being a band so inextricable from their home venue, Maxwell’s in Hoboken, the place […]

Continue Reading

Bands that sound like Yo La Tengo and Beach Fossils

Posted by Jason Diamond I wasn’t going to try and be clever with the title for this post, it simply is what it is: a band that sounds like Yo La Tengo and Beach Fossils. The Hairs are from Brooklyn, and the inspiration for their sound is so simple that it’s brilliant.  There’s also hints of Belle & Sebastian turned up to ten (the organ reminds me of the group’s earlier work), and a bunch of other bands that released […]

Continue Reading

Bites: Juliet Linderman Interviews Paul Auster, LOOK on Display, Wes Anderson’s Music Choices, and more

Juliet Linderman, managing editor of The Greenpoint Gazette and featured reader at last month’s Vol. 1 Storytelling anniversary party, has lovingly and skillfully interviewed Paul Auster for The Rumpus. It is “lovingly” done in the sense that she clearly holds the novelist to eminent, celebratory respect, and “skillful” in that she just did it really fucking well. And Auster upholds it with his writerly charm, eclipsing the recent unpleasing flavor left atop my literary taste buds by Cormac McCarthy.

Continue Reading

Bites: Inglorious Wizerds, Keats on the big screen, Neil Gaiman’s library, Thurston on Gossip Girl, and more

“Dark wizard ain’t got no charms. They’re the foot-soldiers of a muggle-hatin’ mass-murderin’ maniac and they need to be destroyed.” Lit. John Keats gets the big screen treatment (thanks The Millions) Michael Kimball interviews Gary Lutz (Thanks The Faster Times) Well, now we know what Neil Gaiman’s library looks like (Thanks Boing Boing) “Jane Austen is dead. Get over it.” (Thanks Indichik) Deckfight pick their top five Southern novels, and take the ballsy route of excluding any Faulkner. Music “Ah, […]

Continue Reading

Bites: Reading Rainbow, Doctorow’s latest, a Twitter opera, and more

R.I.P. Butterfly in the Sky.  (If you can’t place the line, Reading Rainbow is dead.) E.L Doctorow’s new novel Homer and Langley is ready, and reviewers can’t stop comparing it to Ragtime.  Okay, he’s a “special genius for ellipsis,” blah blah blah.  Whatever, “the scandalous allure of a New York tabloid series” is totally exciting to me. On the High Line, there is a new art installation visible especially at night.  While not naked hotel-guests, the exhilerating sense of that […]

Continue Reading

Bites: Twilight, The Beets, Leonard Michaels, and asking what really matters anymore?

Hipster Runoff “tries to understand Twilight, without actually reading it.” And in doing so, writes just about the only thing on the movie/book that I’ve ever cared enough to read about. Vol. 1 Story Series reader, and contributor to the site, Tobias Carroll went to go see The Beets, Golden Triangle, and Thee Oh Sees (maybe the best lineup of the summer), and this is what he thought. Tablet discusses the essays of the late Leonard Michaels Carrie Brownstein asks […]

Continue Reading