Afternoon Bites: Gilbert Hernandez Interviewed, Russians Watching “The Americans,” Spiritualized, and More

Gilbert Hernandez talked to the ComiXologist about his new graphic novel Julio’s Day. The Atlantic Wire’s Spring books preview should help your to-read lists expand in epic fashion. Richard Metzger looks back on David Byrne’s opera The Catherine Wheel. When D & D meets Oblique Strategies… The Men’s Ben Greenberg on the debut from Chelsea Light Moving. Alisa Louise Merchant’s essay “Bleakness. Laughter. Liberation?” is very much worth your time. Masha Gessen is asked about Russian reactions to The Americans. Matthew Perpetua on […]

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Afternoon Bites: Chelsea Light Moving’s Debut, Yeti Listener Hour, New Ben Katchor, xTx Interviewed, and More

“Part of Chelsea Light Moving’s aesthetic evolves from Moore’s art punk historian status, and the three initial singles work that professorial thread. “Frank O’Hara Hit” is a conspiracy theory about a date that brings together O’Hara, Dylan, Jagger and Moore himself.” Scott Branson on the debut from Chelsea Light Moving. Yeti‘s Mike McGonigal has started a podcast series, the Yeti Listener Hour. Volumes one and two are now up. xTx talked with The Outlet. And if you liked that, perhaps […]

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Afternoon Bites: Thurston Moore’s New Band, Pie Chart “2666,” Endless Boogie, and More

  “Endless Boogie gets one over on other longform rock outfits like Wooden Shjips because they don’t make it look easy. Some of these other jammy/think-they’re-rockin’ outfits are content to just ride a groove until they think no one’s listening anymore. Endless Boogie goes a lot deeper.” Doug Mosurock on Endless Boogie’s Long Island. Joyland’s podcast, Truth & Fiction, features Emily Schultz in conversation with Emily St. John Mandel. A while back, we wrote about Survival Knife, featuring a few former […]

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Thurston Moore’s “Benediction” on NPR

Posted by Jason Diamond Two of the three albums in Thurston Moore’s solo canon are masterpieces (I can’t vouch for the 1999 record, Vouch, because I haven’t listened to it, also because it’s such a massive collaborative effort, that I feel weird calling it ‘solo’).  Psychic Hearts and Trees Outside the Academy are records that are nearly as crucial as any of his work in Sonic Youth (please note the stress on the word “nearly”), and are both full of […]

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