“Calamity and Despair”

“Calamity and Despair”
by Filiz Turhan

Back in the 90s, I worked as a private SAT tutor. I travelled to all kinds of jaw-dropping apartments around the city, raking in about $40 an hour, billed through It-Shall-Remain-Nameless Tutoring Agency that mainly served the populations of elite Manhattan private schools. 

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In What Year Does Your Semiautobiographical Masterpiece Take Place?

Calendar

If there’s one question a young writer dreads, it’s what is your devilishly handsome semiautobiographical masterpiece all about, anyway? But the question this writer dreads even more is the one I got asked the other day at the Wicker Park Renegade Craft Festival: in what year does your masterpiece take place? Because as a writer I long ago had to put the cult of years behind me. 

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Steve Groove

Steve Groove

Steve Groove
by Nate Waggoner

Just before we left the bar, Alex struck up a conversation with a thin middle-aged man in a baseball cap. The man left at the same time as us, lugging a cardboard container for a box fan. The man said, “Hey, uh, any chance you cool cats wanna give this guy a ride home? I live just down the parkway.” 

We three friends made brief eye contact about it, then Evan obliged the man. The man said, “My name’s Groove. But you can call me Steve Groove.”

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We Used To

A whole lot of wires

We Used To
by Luke Wiget

God loves things by becoming them. —Richard Rohr, The Universal Christ 

I find Young in My Head on Spotify before heading to work where my business cards remind me I’m Luke Wiget, Creative Content Manager at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Downtown Nashville. It’s Tuesday, maybe, and I’m beat, definitely, as I hit Gallatin Pike South and “Hey, Are You Listening?” lifts with Gibson riffs I know are Jason Martin and Moog drones I believe are the producer TW Walsh, one of Martin’s longtime collaborators who played on and mastered this seemingly final Starflyer 59 record—that is if you’re listening to any of the words on this retrospective ten-song album. The first track feels to be in first and second person and it nulls Jason Martin like the violins they used to teach us about phasing in our recording classes. They loved to tell us that if two of the same instruments struck the same note at the same time they’d create silence.  

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Self-Portraits and Empty Frames in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum 

Self-Portraits and Empty Frames in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
by Jessica Vestuto

My apartment is small, the picture-hanging real estate even smaller—two large windows and a row of cabinets in the kitchenette leave limited surface into which you can hammer a nail. I have lived in Boston for a few months, and in a few months, I managed to acquire a varied collection of wall art. A New Yorker cover. A travel ad for Chamonix. A Bauhaus poster. A photo of young David Bowie riding a subway in Japan, all blonde and cheekbones. With each new piece, the surrounding empty space on the wall becomes more obvious, and the space bothers me until it is filled. On the phone with my sister one night, I learn my collection had become cause for familial concern. “Mom thinks you have so much hanging on your walls because you’re lonely,” she says. 

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End of the Dog Days

End of the Dog Days
by Karen Eileen Sikola 

There is a picture in my mind, of a man with no shirt, his belly taut, his skin burnt from the sun, which reflects off his bald head. In his hand is one of those plastic wands that chucks tennis balls as far as the stream flows between our facing townhouses and Hardy Pond. At his feet is a red-nosed pit bull named Reddy, his tongue dripping in anticipation, his eyes awaiting the next throw.

There is another picture in my mind, of a man with no shirt, his belly heaving, his skin splattered with blood, which runs down from a gash on his bald head. In his hand is a kitchen knife, and at his feet, a woman who always welcomed me home, her eyes awaiting the final blow.

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Epitaph for Steve Cannon

Strong as the base of a mountain | There’s no countin’ | How many MCs have sprung from my fountain
– Rza, from Biochemical Equation

 

Looking back at the date and time when Steve Cannon died, I was reading a hefty tome titled A Poet’s Glossary, a section with entries for Elegy, Encomium, Endecha, Epicedium, Epitaph, and Epode. Steve telling me through cosmic avenues that he was dying or had died? Maybe.

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Personal Essay

Personal Essay
by Grace Elliott

 

I am trying to learn how to write personal essays. For years, I have struggled with how to write true stories about myself. I worry about the lack of special in my life, the lack of event. 

“The point is not the events,” I tell myself now as I try to learn how to write essays. “The point is the frame.”

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