Signs I Have Known: On pattern-making and narrative exhaustion

Ocean

Not long ago, I sat by the ocean and watched the surf break. Each wave brought with it its own sense of drama, crashing against the rocky shore and drenching backwards, spit through teeth. It was like serialized television: I couldn’t look away. Some of the waves were majestic, cresting towards me from far away and exploding up in milky foam, but some were disappointments. These would approach and then die out, shoved backwards by the recession of their predecessors, or else just losing steam. Others still were happy surprises, unassuming until their final curl, at which point they would smash to shore as joyful and furious as headbanging teenagers.

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Vol.1 Brooklyn’s June 2018 Book Preview

As June approaches, the temperatures outside are rising, and various dreams of a long spring are dashed until next year. June also brings with it a host of books we’ve been eager to read for a while now, including new books by longtime favorites, structurally bold works that take literature into new places, and short fiction that ventures into surreal and sinister places. Here’s a look at some of the books we’re most excited about for June.

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Midnight in the Garden of Women

Midnight in the Garden of Women by Adrienne Celt It’s been said your relationship to sleep is a mirror of your relationship to yourself. This is certainly a truism in crime novels and TV shows: the guilty party, once behind bars, sleeps like a baby. He knows he’s been caught, and so he takes his rest where he can get it, while the innocent party, the falsely accused, stays awake in the next cell over and frets.

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